Thing 36: Flash Cards, Quiz Games, and More

So many tools are available for quizzes and flash cards that it is impossible to just pick one. I have used Google Forms, Quizlet, and various crossword puzzle creators.

Games can be a good way for students to learn something that they need to memorize. For example, the Quizlet below was created to help my 5th and 6th grade students memorize the titles of the books and authors for Battle of the Books. I also print out a simple set of cards so that students can play a sort of memory game using them especially if they don’t have the Internet at home.

 https://quizlet.com/141536052/flashcards/embed

I have seen Kahoot being used in a very active 3rd grade classroom. At the time, the students were in pairs but only one student at a time could answer the question and the teacher grouped  teams separately from the game. Kahoot has since added a team function which would increase collaboration and also competition. Creating a new quiz in Kahoot only took me as long as it took for me to find pictures and decide on questions as it was that easy to use. It only took me a few minutes to create a quiz on the parts of a book that I could use with my 1st or even 2nd grade students. The drag and drop feature for adding pictures was a simple and quick way to add visual appeal to the quiz although it did add to the time to create the quiz. If you weren’t worried about images and already had the questions ready, you could have a Kahoot created within minutes and ready for your students to use. I have created a similar quiz using Google Forms but I think the students would love the competition that Kahoot  provides.

Although I didn’t create a quiz using StudyStack, I did check out a few of the premade quizzes and enjoyed playing them. I found flashcards about nonfiction terms that I could use with my upper elementary students sort of like a pretest to see what information they know and what I still need to teach (or reteach). While exploring further, I discovered that these flashcards could be turned into different types of quizzes such as hangman, matching, and crossword. These options would allow a student to choose the method that would help them learn the best which is a big plus over some of the other options I explored.

Last year right before 4th grade science testing, I collaborated with a 4th grade class to have them create flashcards to go along with the various science terms they would need for the test. We used an app called Lifecards – Postcards by Vivid Apps to create them and students were able to add at least one picture, the definition, and a sentence using the vocabulary term. The process helped them learn the terminology and they had fun finding a picture that would help them remember — not one that I thought would be best. Below is an example of one created by one of my students.

pendulum

Flashcards, games, and quizzes are a great way to engage students in something that might otherwise be tedious to them. A student creating a quiz for the class would also be a roundabout way of assessing how much that student learned without them necessarily knowing they are being assessed. Although I primarily use quizzes as an exit ticket or summative assessment, that is not the only use for them and I’ll have to remember to use them the next time I find my students bored with their current assignment..

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